BSB directory BSB Education BSB lectures BSB Mission Patient Earth Germany has a lot of industry. Filters, efficient machines reduce air pollution, water contamination. Rules and laws against erosion try to reduce climate change damage with renewable energy
Logo of Bear Springs Blossom Nature Conservation, international charitable nonprofit organization providing nature conservation education to all countries on Earth Signature of Bear Springs Blossom Nature Conservation, international charitable nonprofit organization Online distance learning Global issue water conservation: population growth, more pollution, more drinking water, lower water quality, more energy, water conservation, Earth's spheres unbalanced. The human body is more than 70% water, water controls virtually every aspect of our health. Water we drink, water we shower in, water we cook with, prepare juices, teas, coffee; water affects our health significantly. Water is the foundation of the body. If the foundation is of poor quality, strength and longevity will not be achieved. water conservation is very important, water is polluted + contaminated. Humans get sick because of water pollution, plants die of polluted air + water, animals cannot reproduce because of polluted water, Earth's children are endangered. Keep earth beautiful - Bear Springs Blossom Nature Conservation, protection of all life, flora + fauna on Earth = human protection, protection of all water on Earth. Learn online about water conservation issues, how to secure your future, how to stay alive with violent weather, floods, earthquakes and storms. Life on earth depends on plants, that produce oxygen, provide food. Millions of years earth balanced a natural environment. Global warming endangers the biodiversity of human food. Conservation views and insights, news: protect bats in the Americas. Wild animal conservation: Bear Springs Blossom Nature Conservation, protection of all life, flora + fauna on Earth = human protection, conservation of all water on Earth = human protection, conservation of all soil on Earth = human protection. Millions of years earth balanced a natural environment. Global warming endangers the energy balance. Conservation of all water on Earth = human protection, conservation of all soil on Earth = human protection through affordable conservation education online to keep nature beautiful. BSB-research + how to keep Nature beautiful + how to secure our future + how to have a better life!
Conservation Education - - - - Keep Earth Beautiful

About Us - - - Contact Us - - - BSB News

What you can do to keep Nature beautiful

How to secure your future
The more you know the better are your decisions
BSB offers facts + information, helping to save money, to stay healthy, to have a better life! BSB nature conservation news online: conserve Nature, preserve the future of your children, subscribe to BSB. Nature conservation through nature education to keep Nature beautiful, to keep all life on Earth alive
More and more people want to make a difference
More and more people are working with us
for a secure future, to have a better life!
BSB conservation education: to make a change we have to think globally, act locally, change personally
Yes, we can secure our future!
The more humans act responsible
the better is the outlook for us
and for our children!

There are many possibilities!
You can make a difference!
How to live in a sustainable environment?
What can we do to fight pollution?
What can we do to reduce climate change?
What can we do to secure our health?

Can we do that and lower our monthly bills? + YES +

1) Everyone can reduce his/her carbon dioxide emissions!
2) Everyone can reduce his/her air pollution emissions!
3) Everone can plant a tree or a CO2 eating plant!
4) Everyone can reduce the amount of fungizide + pestizides!
5) Everyone can ask his/her political party to go green!
6) Everyone can reduce gasoline usage by driving green!

Search BSB with your question
For more detailed answers, just send us an email!

The most important task is to update your conservation education!
Better informed people make better decisions!


BSB solar energy information: solar cells and solar power should be on everyone what to do list. Renewable energy reduces floods which are caused by unbalanced weather.  Climate change + the greenhouse effect from burning fossil fuels fast causes global warming, droughts, stronger earthquakes. Read what you can do to lower your impact
Solar panels on the roof of Bear Springs Blossom Nature Center

The US and China are the largest contributors to global warming on Earth.
The US average annual emissions are 19.6 tons per person, nearly five times the Earth average of 3.9 tons per person.
But it is possible to reduce the amount of CO2 that we generate!
Possible, without changing our life totally -

Cut your CO2 emissions by ~20,000 pounds (10 tons) and save a lot of money!
With these easy actions:

Conservation At Home

Choose clean energy
Where possible select a power plan that uses clean energy.
You can save up to 8,000 lbs of CO2 per Year

what a difference we can make when we recycle. We reduce the damage of floods caused by climate change. The greenhouse effect makes floods, droughts + wildfires stronger leading to a global warming. Read what you can do to lower the impact Recycle
Recycling saves a lot of energy needed to make new products.
Recycle 50% of your glass, aluminum, plastic, cardboard and newspapers.
Recycle more! You can save 2.400 pounds of carbon dioxide per year by recycling just half of your household waste. You can save ...

You will get much more information and tips, when you become a member of
BSB Nature Conservation!
Want to know what BSB members are thinking?

Hello from Triple and Tammy!
I enjoyed your web site and the way you presented this very important information. The timing of this is perfect for what we are going through here on our new property.
The funny thing about humans is that we don't take care of things that we don't understand and we don't take care of things that we do not feel we own.
Most humans don't feel they own Earth and for certain, not many actually own any large amount of this planet.
We have discovered that since we now own a piece of property, that we care for this piece of property a lot better than any of the owners before us. It is appalling to us to find trash and waste right here on our property, left there by the previous owners who didn't care enough about their own property to take care of it.
Through our association with BSB, we have come to learn and appreciate the importance of caring for our property and therefore Earth. And, the strange part is that this caring that we now understand is not only going to help Earth, but it will also improve our enjoyment of our new property.
So it only stands to reason that when we take care of our Earth, that we are also taking care of ourselves.
We are already seeing improvements in the quality of our property by implementing just a few of your suggestions. There are so many more ideas that we need to put into force and we will no doubt enjoy those improvements once we have gotten around to doing them. It is through the hard work and efforts of great people like you two that so many of us will learn to take better care of our wonderful planet Earth.
Thanks for your continued flow of useful information.
Triple and Tammy Nickel
US Air force retirees


Want to know more?
How to upgrade your property?
Get the facts - show responsibility - save money! Every BSB members makes a difference!

Your education at Your time! With us you can advance your skills.
We offer distance learning - online classes. Learn when ever you have the time!

You can do a lot for patient Earth and your bank account!

Change a light!
Replacing 1 regular light bulb with a compact fluorescent light bulb will save 140 pounds of carbon dioxide a year.

Drive less
Walk, bike, carpool or take mass transit
You’ll save one pound of carbon dioxide for every mile you don’t drive!

Check your tires
Keeping your tires inflated properly improves gas mileage by more than 3%.
Every gallon of gasoline saved keeps 20 lbs of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere!

Use less hot water or install a solar hot water heater

Avoid products with a lot of packaging

Plant a tree - rescue a tree!
A single tree will absorb 1 ton of carbon dioxide over its lifetime.

Turn off electronic devices
Simply turning off your television, DVD player, stereo, and computer when you’re not using them will save you thousands of pounds of carbon dioxide a year.

Spread the word!



Europe at night - light pollution is bad for animals, bad for humans, causing air pollution and water contamination. Electricity is produced by coal fired power-plants - what to do? use less energy to save earth
Europe at night - a lot of light pollution

Keep Earth Beautiful - live a sustainable life - see what climate change will do to your children's future
What can You Do Right Now?
1. Turn lights and appliances off when you leave the room. It only takes a second, and those savings can really add up.
2. Scrape—rather than rinsing—dishes, and only run the dishwasher when you have a full load. This simple step can save up to 20 gallons of heated water a day.
3. Turn your hot water heater down to 120 degrees (or the “low” setting).
4. Replace your old shower head with a low-flow model. This can save you up to $145 every year by reducing water heating costs!
5. Replace incandescent light bulbs with CFLs to cut your lighting costs by up to 75 percent.
Better: Replace incandescent light bulbs with LED bulbs to cut your lightning costs by up to 94%. Many Walmart stores carry LED bulbs for 4 - 12 Dollars.
6. Plug appliances into power strips and turn them off when not in use. One great way to reduce that energy waste is with power strips, which can be turned off to prevent electricity flowing to appliances when it’s not needed.
7. Use a laundry detergent formulated for use in cold water, and wash your laundry using cold water only. 90 percent of the energy used to wash clothes goes to heating water. Consider using a drying rack or clothesline instead of drying clothes in a dryer. If you do use a dryer, keep your lint trap clean and save over $40 every year.
8. Put aluminum foil behind radiators to reflect heat back into the room.
9. Simple maintenance: keep radiators and refrigerator coils clean and free of dust. Clean or replace the filters in your furnace, water heater, and/or air conditioner.
10. For every degree you turn down your thermostat in the winter, or turn it up in summer, you save over 3 percent on your energy bill!! You can install a programmable thermostat to automatically implement those energy savings when you leave for the day.


BSB offers a great variety of information:
+ Information for Landowners:
+ Where is the best place to build my house?
+ Facing North or South?
+ Green building - is that important to me?
+ The use of Solar energy
+ Can I use Wind energy
+ What about Water Conservation
+ Rainwater Harvesting is easy, saves money
+ How to handle native plants?
+ Is Erosion Control important?
We help our members to save money!
We answer your questions!


BSB is the home for Nature lovers and wants to share our love with you!
A wonderful story about what a human can do was published in 1953 - its inspiring...

The Man Who Planted Trees

by Jean Giono - translation from French by Peter Doyle

In order for the character of a human being to reveal truly exceptional qualities, we must have the good fortune to observe its action over a long period of years. If this action is devoid of all selfishness, if the idea that directs it is one of unqualified generosity, if it is absolutely certain that it has not sought recompense anywhere, and if moreover it has left visible marks on the world, then we are unquestionably dealing with an unforgettable character.
About forty years ago I went on a long hike, through hills absolutely unknown to tourists, in that very old region where the Alps penetrate into Provence.
This region is bounded to the south-east and south by the middle course of the Durance, between Sisteron and Mirabeau; to the north by the upper course of the Drôme, from its source down to Die; to the west by the plains of Comtat Venaissin and the outskirts of Mont Ventoux. It includes all the northern part of the Département of Basses-Alpes, the south of Drôme and a little enclave of Vaucluse.
At the time I undertook my long walk through this deserted region, it consisted of barren and monotonous lands, at about 1200 to 1300 meters above sea level. Nothing grew there except wild lavender.
I was crossing this country at its widest part, and after walking for three days, I found myself in the most complete desolation. I was camped next to the skeleton of an abandoned village. I had used the last of my water the day before and I needed to find more. Even though they were in ruins, these houses all huddled together and looking like an old wasps' nest made me think that there must at one time have been a spring or a well there. There was indeed a spring, but it was dry. The five or six roofless houses, ravaged by sun and wind, and the small chapel with its tumble-down belfry, were arrayed like the houses and chapels of living villages, but all life had disappeared.

It was a beautiful June day with plenty of sun, but on these shelterless lands, high up in the sky, the wind whistled with an unendurable brutality. Its growling in the carcasses of the houses was like that of a wild beast disturbed during its meal.
I had to move my camp. After five hours of walking, I still hadn't found water, and nothing gave me hope of finding any. Everywhere there was the same dryness, the same stiff, woody plants. I thought I saw in the distance a small black silhouette. On a chance I headed towards it. It was a shepherd. Thirty lambs or so were resting near him on the scorching ground.
He gave me a drink from his gourd and a little later he led me to his shepherd's cottage, tucked down in an undulation of the plateau. He drew his water - excellent - from a natural hole, very deep, above which he had installed a rudimentary windlass.
This man spoke little. This is common among those who live alone, but he seemed sure of himself, and confident in this assurance, which seemed remarkable in this land shorn of everything. He lived not in a cabin but in a real house of stone, from the looks of which it was clear that his own labor had restored the ruins he had found on his arrival. His roof was solid and water-tight. The wind struck against the roof tiles with the sound of the sea crashing on the beach.
His household was in order, his dishes washed, his floor swept, his rifle greased; his soup boiled over the fire; I noticed then that he was also freshly shaven, that all his buttons were solidly sewn, and that his clothes were mended with such care as to make the patches invisible.
He shared his soup with me, and when afterwards I offered him my tobacco pouch, he told me that he didn't smoke. His dog, as silent as he, was friendly without being fawning.

It had been agreed immediately that I would pass the night there, the closest village being still more than a day and a half farther on. Furthermore, I understood perfectly well the character of the rare villages of that region. There are four or five of them dispersed far from one another on the flanks of the hills, in groves of white oaks at the very ends of roads passable by carriage. They are inhabited by woodcutters who make charcoal. They are places where the living is poor. The families, pressed together in close quarters by a climate that is exceedingly harsh, in summer as well as in winter, struggle ever more selfishly against each other. Irrational contention grows beyond all bounds, fueled by a continuous struggle to escape from that place. The men carry their charcoal to the cities in their trucks, and then return. The most solid qualities crack under this perpetual Scottish shower. The women stir up bitterness. There is competition over everything, from the sale of charcoal to the benches at church. The virtues fight amongst themselves, the vices fight amongst themselves, and there is a ceaseless general combat between the vices and the virtues. On top of all that, the equally ceaseless wind irritates the nerves. There are epidemics of suicides and numerous cases of insanity, almost always murderous.
The shepherd, who did not smoke, took out a bag and poured a pile of acorns out onto the table. He began to examine them one after another with a great deal of attention, separating the good ones from the bad. I smoked my pipe. I offered to help him, but he told me it was his own business. Indeed, seeing the care that he devoted to this job, I did not insist. This was our whole conversation. When he had in the good pile a fair number of acorns, he counted them out into packets of ten. In doing this he eliminated some more of the acorns, discarding the smaller ones and those that that showed even the slightest crack, for he examined them very closely. When he had before him one hundred perfect acorns he stopped, and we went to bed.
The company of this man brought me a feeling of peace. I asked him the next morning if I might stay and rest the whole day with him. He found that perfectly natural. Or more exactly, he gave me the impression that nothing could disturb him. This rest was not absolutely necessary to me, but I was intrigued and I wanted to find out more about this man. He let out his flock and took them to the pasture. Before leaving, he soaked in a bucket of water the little sack containing the acorns that he had so carefully chosen and counted.
I noted that he carried as a sort of walking stick an iron rod as thick as his thumb and about one and a half meters long. I set off like someone out for a stroll, following a route parallel to his. His sheep pasture lay at the bottom of a small valley. He left his flock in the charge of his dog and climbed up towards the spot where I was standing. I was afraid that he was coming to reproach me for my indiscretion, but not at all : It was his own route and he invited me to come along with him if I had nothing better to do. He continued on another two hundred meters up the hill.
Having arrived at the place he had been heading for, he begin to pound his iron rod into the ground. This made a hole in which he placed an acorn, whereupon he covered over the hole again. He was planting oak trees. I asked him if the land belonged to him. He answered no. Did he know whose land it was? He did not know. He supposed that it was communal land, or perhaps it belonged to someone who did not care about it. He himself did not care to know who the owners were. In this way he planted his one hundred acorns with great care.

After the noon meal, he began once more to pick over his acorns. I must have put enough insistence into my questions, because he answered them. For three years now he had been planting trees in this solitary way. He had planted one hundred thousand. Of these one hundred thousand, twenty thousand had come up. He counted on losing another half of them to rodents and to everything else that is unpredictable in the designs of Providence. That left ten thousand oaks that would grow in this place where before there was nothing.
It was at this moment that I began to wonder about his age. He was clearly more than fifty. Fifty-five, he told me. His name was Elzéard Bouffier. He had owned a farm in the plains, where he lived most of his life. He had lost his only son, and then his wife. He had retired into this solitude, where he took pleasure in living slowly, with his flock of sheep and his dog. He had concluded that this country was dying for lack of trees. He added that, having nothing more important to do, he had resolved to remedy the situation.
Leading as I did at the time a solitary life, despite my youth, I knew how to treat the souls of solitary people with delicacy. Still, I made a mistake. It was precisely my youth that forced me to imagine the future in my own terms, including a certain search for happiness. I told him that in thirty years these ten thousand trees would be magnificent. He replied very simply that, if God gave him life, in thirty years he would have planted so many other trees that these ten thousand would be like a drop of water in the ocean.
He had also begun to study the propagation of beeches. and he had near his house a nursery filled with seedlings grown from beechnuts. His little wards, which he had protected from his sheep by a screen fence, were growing beautifully. He was also considering birches for the valley bottoms where, he told me, moisture lay slumbering just a few meters beneath the surface of the soil.
We parted the next day.

The next year the war of 14 came, in which I was engaged for five years. An infantryman could hardly think about trees. To tell the truth, the whole business hadn't made a very deep impression on me; I took it to be a hobby, like a stamp collection, and forgot about it.
With the war behind me, I found myself with a small demobilization bonus and a great desire to breathe a little pure air. Without any preconceived notion beyond that, I struck out again along the trail through that deserted country.
The land had not changed. Nonetheless, beyond that dead village I perceived in the distance a sort of gray fog that covered the hills like a carpet. Ever since the day before I had been thinking about the shepherd who planted trees. « Ten thousand oaks, I had said to myself, must really take up a lot of space. »
I had seen too many people die during those five years not to be able to imagine easily the death of Elzéard Bouffier, especially since when a man is twenty he thinks of a man of fifty as an old codger for whom nothing remains but to die. He was not dead. In fact, he was very spry. He had changed his job. He only had four sheep now, but to make up for this he had about a hundred beehives. He had gotten rid of the sheep because they threatened his crop of trees. He told me (as indeed I could see for myself) that the war had not disturbed him at all. He had continued imperturbably with his planting.
The oaks of 1910 were now ten years old and were taller than me and than him. The spectacle was impressive. I was literally speechless and, as he didn't speak himself, we passed the whole day in silence, walking through his forest. It was in three sections, eleven kilometers long overall and, at its widest point, three kilometers wide. When I considered that this had all sprung from the hands and from the soul of this one man - without technical aids - , it struck me that men could be as effective as God in domains other than destruction.
He had followed his idea, and the beeches that reached up to my shoulders and extending as far as the eye could see bore witness to it. The oaks were now good and thick, and had passed the age where they were at the mercy of rodents; as for the designs of Providence, to destroy the work that had been created would henceforth require a cyclone. He showed me admirable stands of birches that dated from five years ago, that is to say from 1915, when I had been fighting at Verdun. He had planted them in the valley bottoms where he had suspected, correctly, that there was water close to the surface. They were as tender as young girls, and very determined.
This creation had the air, moreover, of working by a chain reaction. He had not troubled about it; he went on obstinately with his simple task. But, in going back down to the village, I saw water running in streams that, within living memory, had always been dry. It was the most striking revival that he had shown me. These streams had borne water before, in ancient days. Certain of the sad villages that I spoke of at the beginning of my account had been built on the sites of ancient Gallo-Roman villages, of which there still remained traces; archeologists digging there had found fishhooks in places where in more recent times cisterns were required in order to have a little water.
The wind had also been at work, dispersing certain seeds. As the water reappeared, so too did willows, osiers, meadows, gardens, flowers, and a certain reason to live.
But the transformation had taken place so slowly that it had been taken for granted, without provoking surprise. The hunters who climbed the hills in search of hares or wild boars had noticed the spreading of the little trees, but they set it down to the natural spitefulness of the earth. That is why no one had touched the work of this man. If they had suspected him, they would have tried to thwart him. But he never came under suspicion : Who among the villagers or the administrators would ever have suspected that anyone could show such obstinacy in carrying out this magnificent act of generosity?
Beginning in 1920 I never let more than a year go by without paying a visit to Elzéard Bouffier. I never saw him waver or doubt, though God alone can tell when God's own hand is in a thing! I have said nothing of his disappointments, but you can easily imagine that, for such an accomplishment, it was necessary to conquer adversity; that, to assure the victory of such a passion, it was necessary to fight against despair. One year he had planted ten thousand maples. They all died. The next year,he gave up on maples and went back to beeches, which did even better than the oaks.
To get a true idea of this exceptional character, one must not forget that he worked in total solitude; so total that, toward the end of his life, he lost the habit of talking. Or maybe he just didn't see the need for it.
In 1933 he received the visit of an astonished forest ranger. This functionary ordered him to cease building fires outdoors, for fear of endangering this natural forest. It was the first time, this naive man told him, that a forest had been observed to grow up entirely on its own. At the time of this incident, he was thinking of planting beeches at a spot twelve kilometers from his house. To avoid the coming and going - because at the time he was seventy-five years old - he planned to build a cabin of stone out where he was doing his planting. This he did the next year.

In 1935, a veritable administrative delegation went to examine this « natural forest ». There was an important personage from Waters and Forests, a deputy, and some technicians. Many useless words were spoken. It was decided to do something, but luckily nothing was done, except for one truly useful thing : placing the forest under the protection of the State and forbidding anyone from coming there to make charcoal. For it was impossible not to be taken with the beauty of these young trees in full health. And the forest exercised its seductive powers even on the deputy himself.
I had a friend among the chief foresters who were with the delegation. I explained the mystery to him. One day the next week, we went off together to look for Elzéard Bouffier, We found him hard at work, twenty kilometers away from the place where the inspection had taken place. This chief forester was not my friend for nothing. He understood the value of things. He knew how to remain silent. I offered up some eggs I had brought with me as a gift. We split our snack three ways, and then passed several hours in mute contemplation of the landscape.

The hillside whence we had come was covered with trees six or seven meters high. I remembered the look of the place in 1913 : a desert... The peaceful and steady labor, the vibrant highland air, his frugality, and above all, the serenity of his soul had given the old man a kind of solemn good health. He was an athlete of God. I asked myself how many hectares he had yet to cover with trees.
Before leaving, my friend made a simple suggestion concerning certain species of trees to which the terrain seemed to be particularly well suited. He was not insistent. « For the very good reason, » he told me afterwards, « that this fellow knows a lot more about this sort of thing than I do. » After another hour of walking, this thought having travelled along with him, he added : « He knows a lot more about this sort of thing than anybody - and he has found a jolly good way of being happy !
It was thanks to the efforts of this chief forester that the forest was protected, and with it, the happiness of this man. He designated three forest rangers for their protection, and terrorized them to such an extent that they remained indifferent to any jugs of wine that the woodcutters might offer as bribes.
The forest did not run any grave risks except during the war of 1939. Then automobiles were being run on wood alcohol, and there was never enough wood. They began to cut some of the stands of the oaks of 1910, but the trees stood so far from any useful road that the enterprise turned out to be bad from a financial point of view, and was soon abandoned. The shepherd never knew anything about it. He was thirty kilometers away, peacefully continuing his task, as untroubled by the war of 39 as he had been of the war of 14.

I saw Elzéard Bouffier for the last time in June of 1945. He was then eighty-seven years old. I had once more set off along my trail through the wilderness, only to find that now, in spite of the shambles in which the war had left the whole country, there was a motor coach running between the valley of the Durance and the mountain. I set down to this relatively rapid means of transportation the fact that I no longer recognized the landmarks I knew from my earlier visits. It also seemed that the route was taking me through entirely new places. I had to ask the name of a village to be sure that I was indeed passing through that same region, once so ruined and desolate. The coach set me down at Vergons. In 1913, this hamlet of ten or twelve houses had had three inhabitants. They were savages, hating each other, and earning their living by trapping : Physically and morally, they resembled prehistoric men . The nettles devoured the abandoned houses that surrounded them. Their lives were without hope, it was only a matter of waiting for death to come : a situation that hardly predisposes one to virtue.
All that had changed, even to the air itself. In place of the dry, brutal gusts that had greeted me long ago, a gentle breeze whispered to me, bearing sweet odors. A sound like that of running water came from the heights above : It was the sound of the wind in the trees. And most astonishing of all, I heard the sound of real water running into a pool. I saw that they had built a fountain, that it was full of water, and what touched me most, that next to it they had planted a lime-tree that must be at least four years old, already grown thick, an incontestable symbol of resurrection.
Furthermore, Vergons showed the signs of labors for which hope is a requirement : Hope must therefore have returned. They had cleared out the ruins, knocked down the broken walls, and rebuilt five houses. The hamlet now counted twenty-eight inhabitants, including four young families. The new houses, freshly plastered, were surrounded by gardens that bore, mixed in with each other but still carefully laid out, vegetables and flowers, cabbages and rosebushes, leeks and gueules-de-loup, celery and anemones. It was now a place where anyone would be glad to live.
From there I continued on foot. The war from which we had just barely emerged had not permitted life to vanish completely, and now Lazarus was out of his tomb. On the lower flanks of the mountain, I saw small fields of barley and rye; in the bottoms of the narrow valleys, meadowlands were just turning green.
It has taken only the eight years that now separate us from that time for the whole country around there to blossom with splendor and ease. On the site of the ruins I had seen in 1913 there are now well-kept farms, the sign of a happy and comfortable life. The old springs, fed by rain and snow now that are now retained by the forests, have once again begun to flow. The brooks have been channelled. Beside each farm, amid groves of maples, the pools of fountains are bordered by carpets of fresh mint. Little by little, the villages have been rebuilt. Yuppies have come from the plains, where land is expensive, bringing with them youth, movement, and a spirit of adventure. Walking along the roads you will meet men and women in full health, and boys and girls who know how to laugh, and who have regained the taste for the traditional rustic festivals. Counting both the previous inhabitants of the area, now unrecognizable from living in plenty, and the new arrivals, more than ten thousand persons owe their happiness to Elzéard Bouffier.

When I consider that a single man, relying only on his own simple physical and moral resources, was able to transform a desert into this land of Canaan, I am convinced that despite everything, the human condition is truly admirable. But when I take into account the constancy, the greatness of soul, and the selfless dedication that was needed to bring about this transformation, I am filled with an immense respect for this old, uncultured peasant who knew how to bring about a work worthy of God.
Elzéard Bouffier died peacefully in 1947 at the hospice in Banon.


Mexico environmental problems include not enough affordable nature conservation education to expand food production Spain offers to little conservation education courses - - - members from Argentina help to spread the word of nature conservation, nature education - - - Indonesia cuts down a lot of tree. Missing nature conservation education leads to deforestation, water contamination, erosion problems because of deforestation, endangering marine life and humans - - - China has a growing population, more energy, more food, nature conservation education is very low on the to do list - - - German schools offer conservation education, but a lot of people are too busy to learn new things

Environmental News    BSB Online education    BSB preserve    Lectures    Keep-Earth-Beautiful    Help   Join
BSB members all work without a salary, donate our time and money.

Conservation Education (CE) is the combination of two words that have become one word to educators.
CE is the ability to give people opportunities to grow in knowledge and create changes to their life style and their environment, to have a better life, to have a safer future! - Search BSB with your search phrase

Copyright Bear Springs Blossom Nature Conservation
International charitable nonprofit organization 501(c)(3) All rights reserved
Peter Bonenberger - volunteer + president - Marianne Bonenberger - volunteer + director of education
BSBNCG POB 63295 Pipe Creek 78063 TX USA - edu@keepearthbeautiful.org

BSB tries to be as accurate as possible, but we are not responsible
for broken or false links or misinterpretation
Privacy Policy: Your privacy is very important to us. We don't collect information from you.
+ BSB was founded 2002 +

WHY wait? Update your Nature knowledge - Join and get personal advice, have a better life!
As a nonprofit organization, BSB is always grateful for donations in support of our mission. donation to charitable nonprofit Bear Springs Blossom Nature Conservation 501(c)(3) are fully tax-deductible

Ask Bearly!
BSB Online Science education: Biology, physics, geography by Bear springs blossom nature education. BSB answers nature education questions based on interdisciplinary science, water conservation for kids, water chemistry, water pollution, answers to see the big picture, to realize how Nature works, why we need knowledge to understand, water issues, updated nature education on recycling, pollution, earth maps, facts on climate, chemicals, healthy air. Why update your nature education? Earth's environment is changed by close to 7 billion humans. Pesticides are toxic. International Nature Conservation preserves Nature to keep humans alive. Conserve Nature to reduce air pollution, to slow down climate change. Solutions how to keep Nature beautiful through conservation. Earth's atmosphere makes life possible, protects life on Earth, conserves warmth, but is changed and endangered by human pollution. International Nature Conservation is needed to keep Nature beautiful, to preserve nature. An updated environmental education about conservation of the environment is essential. Updated environmental news online, science classes, land restoration workshops, how to conserve nature = Earth's environment, how to keep biodiversity, how to reduce habitat destruction in a global world. Deforestation is a global issue. Interdisciplinary science works with conservation facts, explains why disasters, floods + droughts occur. How clean water, volcano environment, and climate change are related. BSB offers pollution solutions, facts about pollution, facts on recycling, water facts, earth globe news on international soil conservation, and air conservation. International Nature conservation is important for human conservation. A nature conservationist tries to save earth nature, reduces the effects of pollution, protects endangered species, does active recycling

Why ....

Pollution

Land pollution

Water Pollution

Fossil Fuels

Glob.Dimming

Glob.Warming

Energy Facts

Air Facts

Greenhouse Gas

Coal burning

Mercury

Methane

Dioxin

Household Waste

Cap and Trade

Climate Scenario

Why is photosynthesis so important?

Why recycling helps humans?

More about Recycling

Why air pollution makes you sick?

Why Wind energy is renewable energy?

Nature Education

Guest Lectures

Conservation Education

BSB Curriculum

Science teacher

Master Conservationist

BSB Questions

Health

Health-Insurance

What can we do?

Why Education?

Education reasons

Global population

Sustainability

Overgrazing

Videos

Religions

Science class

Biology

How life works

Photosynthesis

Chlorophyll

Earth

Geology of Earth

Geology

Abundant Elements

Earth Oceans

MAPS

Map Info

Maps of Earth

Maps of North-South America

Map of Texas

Maps of Europe

Maps of Asia

Map of Africa

Maps of Oceania Australia

QUIZZES:

BSB Quizzes

Bird quiz

Body Quiz

Environment Quiz

Flower quiz

Nature quiz

Ocean quiz

Recycle quiz

Water Quiz

Quiz Info

Famous Men Quiz

WATER:

Water Facts

Water Data

About Water

Why Earth has water

Water testing

Water Filter

Water pH

Salinity

Hydrogen

The H in H2O

Water Pollution

Water life

Coral reefs

Earth Oceans

Atlantic Ocean

Ocean acidification

Ocean currents

Watershed divide

Riparian Areas

Power from Water

Water conservation

Tips to save water

Water Conservation/kids

Water + Energy

Water + Trees

Thirsty for water

Water Drought article

Rainwater

Why Rainbows?

Water conservation kids Why your car needs so much gasoline?

How do maps of Earth look like?

Can you name this bird?

What effect have Greenhouse gases?

All about Water!

What's a Master Conservationist?

Why is Earth sick?

Why we see a rainbow?

What are tar-sands?

Where to find all Science lessons?

How do Northern lights look like?

Why needs Water Energy?

What is a Smart Grid?

Mexican free-tailed bats

What did Archimedes?

Can You hear the voices of the trees?

Who is Flora + Fauna?

Why should we test Water?

How can I save water?

Why I am the only bear in the TX Hill Country?

How long can fish fly?

Hermann Hesse Trees?

How do Tree Tunnels look?

Why mushrooms look so different?

Why green leaves turn red in fall?

Why do mammals have blood?

Why is burning plastic dangerous?

Why to avoid pesticides?

Why mountains + volcanoes exist?

Why is biodiversity important?

How to keep Nature beautiful?

How does an arrowhead look like?

What birds live in Central Texas?

Are there green solutions?

How to save money with sunshine?

Want to train your brain?

Nature Conservation


BSB research and external studies clearly show that almost all terrorists have very low education levels. Support to BSB helps to spread an always updated education to all. Better informed people make better decisions, having a better life!

Fair Use Notice
All material on 880+ BSB web-pages is intended to advance understanding of the environmental, social, scientific, and economic issues of Nature conservation. We believe this constitutes a "fair use" of any copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed an interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. If you wish to use copyrighted material from our websites for purposes of your own that go beyond "fair use," you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. If you are the owner of copyrighted material(s) appearing on this site, and wish it to be removed, please contact us directly.